Lauren Catherine

17th September 2014

Photo reblogged from WORDS N QUOTES with 132 notes

wordsnquotes:

AUTHOR OF THE DAY: Vladimir Nabokov
Vladimir Nabokov was born on April 22, 1899 in St. Petersburg, Russia. He was a Russian novelist and critic best known for his distinct writing style.
Nabokov was born into an extremely political and highly cultured family. The Nabokov family fled Russia following the Bolshevik revolution in 1919. The Nabokov home was trilingual. As a child, Nabokov read Edgar Allan Poe, John Keats, H.G. Wells, Leo Tolstoy, Anton Chekov, Gustave Flaubert and more. He studied romance languages and Slavic at Trinity College, Cambridge. He graduated with honors in 1922. 
The following eighteen years he lived in Berlin and Paris, where he wrote in Russian under the pseudonym Vladimir Sirin. He supported himself through translations, lessons in English and lessons in tennis. He, also, composed the first crossword puzzles in Russian. 
In 1940, Nabokov was on the move once more after having fled Russia and Germany, he was forced to leave France for the United States.  Nabokov decided to give up writing fiction in Russian and began to compose in English. He exclaimed with great sadness:

"My private tragedy, which cannot, and indeed should not, be anybody’s concern, is that I had to abandon my natural idiom, my untrammeled, rich, and infinitely docile Russian tongue for a second-rate brand of English, devoid of any of those apparatuses—the baffling mirror, the black velvet backdrop, the implied associations and traditions which the native illusionist, frac-tails flying, can magically use to transcend the heritage in his own way."

Despite his feelings of melancholy after abandoning his native language, this period rose Nabokov to fame with arguably his best work, including Lolita. He also worked on translations of his Russian novels into English. He revealed in an interview:

"Lolita is famous, not I. I am an obscure, doubly obscure, novelist with an unpronounceable name."

Lolita was an instant classic and made Nabokov a household name. He wrote Lolita while traveling the west coast in the United States in search of butterflies for his collection. He once declared: 

“Literature and butterflies are the two sweetest passions known to man.”

His career in entomology was as equally distinguished as his writing. He is known for his intricate use of words and heavily ornate writing style. His use of complex plots, alliteration, and playful linguistics make Nabokov’s literature breathtakingly beautiful and pretentious. His attention to language is a surgical artistry defined by the complexity of his prose and characters. It is obvious that his trilingual upbringing had a profound influence over his artistry. During his lifetime he also wrote literary criticism and translated Russian literature, including Alexander Pushkin’s epic, Eugene Onegin. 
After the success of Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov moved back to Europe. He died on July 2, 1977 in Montreux, Switzerland. 
NOTABLE WORKS
Lolita (1955)
Pale Fire (1962)
Speak, Memory (1936–1966)
Ada, or Ardor (1969)
Read excerpts by Vladimir Nabokov here! Get his books here! 
[img src]

wordsnquotes:

AUTHOR OF THE DAY: Vladimir Nabokov

Vladimir Nabokov was born on April 22, 1899 in St. Petersburg, Russia. He was a Russian novelist and critic best known for his distinct writing style.

Nabokov was born into an extremely political and highly cultured family. The Nabokov family fled Russia following the Bolshevik revolution in 1919. The Nabokov home was trilingual. As a child, Nabokov read Edgar Allan Poe, John Keats, H.G. Wells, Leo Tolstoy, Anton Chekov, Gustave Flaubert and more. He studied romance languages and Slavic at Trinity College, Cambridge. He graduated with honors in 1922. 

The following eighteen years he lived in Berlin and Paris, where he wrote in Russian under the pseudonym Vladimir Sirin. He supported himself through translations, lessons in English and lessons in tennis. He, also, composed the first crossword puzzles in Russian. 

In 1940, Nabokov was on the move once more after having fled Russia and Germany, he was forced to leave France for the United States.  Nabokov decided to give up writing fiction in Russian and began to compose in English. He exclaimed with great sadness:

"My private tragedy, which cannot, and indeed should not, be anybody’s concern, is that I had to abandon my natural idiom, my untrammeled, rich, and infinitely docile Russian tongue for a second-rate brand of English, devoid of any of those apparatuses—the baffling mirror, the black velvet backdrop, the implied associations and traditions which the native illusionist, frac-tails flying, can magically use to transcend the heritage in his own way."

Despite his feelings of melancholy after abandoning his native language, this period rose Nabokov to fame with arguably his best work, including Lolita. He also worked on translations of his Russian novels into English. He revealed in an interview:

"Lolita is famous, not I. I am an obscure, doubly obscure, novelist with an unpronounceable name."

Lolita was an instant classic and made Nabokov a household name. He wrote Lolita while traveling the west coast in the United States in search of butterflies for his collection. He once declared: 

Literature and butterflies are the two sweetest passions known to man.”

His career in entomology was as equally distinguished as his writing. He is known for his intricate use of words and heavily ornate writing style. His use of complex plots, alliteration, and playful linguistics make Nabokov’s literature breathtakingly beautiful and pretentious. His attention to language is a surgical artistry defined by the complexity of his prose and characters. It is obvious that his trilingual upbringing had a profound influence over his artistry. During his lifetime he also wrote literary criticism and translated Russian literature, including Alexander Pushkin’s epic, Eugene Onegin

After the success of Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov moved back to Europe. He died on July 2, 1977 in Montreux, Switzerland. 

NOTABLE WORKS

Lolita (1955)

Pale Fire (1962)

Speak, Memory (1936–1966)

Ada, or Ardor (1969)

Read excerpts by Vladimir Nabokov here! Get his books here

[img src]

17th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from He who wishes to wear the ♛ endures its weight. with 61 notes

the-inheritors:

             Kim Woo Bin for SIEG.

17th September 2014

Chat reblogged from I Am A Fantasy Parade with 512 notes

somewhere in heaven

  • hemingway: so what did you think of my new draft?
  • fitzgerald: i mean if you like that sort of thing i guess it was good
  • hemingway: ...what does that mean
  • fitzgerald: nothing just it has a very honest narrative tone, it presents in an extremely frank way and there's something strikingly transparent about the characterization you have going on
  • hemingway: oh no
  • fitzgerald: i guess you could say it's...a little too...earnest.
  • hemingway: godAMMIT FITZ

Source:

17th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Caelitus mihi vires. with 1,534 notes


The fact that our desires will be always greater than what world has to offer us, because he has set eternity in our hearts.

The fact that our desires will be always greater than what world has to offer us, because he has set eternity in our hearts.

Source: worshipgifs

17th September 2014

Quote reblogged from Inspiration for a Catholic Life with 1,316 notes

Do not think that love in order to be genuine has to be extraordinary. What we need is to love without getting tired. Be faithful in the small things, because it is in them that your strength lies.
— Mother Teresa  (via sorakeem)

Source: breanna-lynn

17th September 2014

Quote reblogged from to love, for love, from Love. with 78,319 notes

I wonder if you ever talk about missing me to anyone.

(via fearlessknightsandfairytales)

That would be a miracle though

(via rise-upp)

Source: an-ti-grav-i-ty

17th September 2014

Post reblogged from to love, for love, from Love. with 29,631 notes

Always pray to have:
1. Eyes that see the best in people.
2. A heart that forgives the worst.
3. A soul that never loses faith.

Source: letssparkachange

17th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Caelitus mihi vires. with 672 notes

panis-angelicus:

There’s something so comforting about praying the Rosary. It’s like holding Our Lady’s promises right there in your hands.

panis-angelicus:

There’s something so comforting about praying the Rosary. It’s like holding Our Lady’s promises right there in your hands.

Source: panis-angelicus

17th September 2014

Post reblogged from Dress To Kill with 33,043 notes

taylorswift:

shakeitoffs:

do you ever just feel like

image

Omg all the time.

Source: shakeitoffs

16th September 2014

Photo reblogged from -Just be spLendid- with 2,465 notes

Source: weheartit.com

16th September 2014

Quote reblogged from -Just be spLendid- with 4,967 notes

You may not be her first, her last, or her only. She loved before she may love again. But if she loves you now, what else matters? She’s not perfect—you aren’t either, and the two of you may never be perfect together but if she can make you laugh, cause you to think twice, and admit to being human and making mistakes, hold onto her and give her the most you can. She may not be thinking about you every second of the day, but she will give you a part of her that she knows you can break—her heart. So don’t hurt her, don’t change her, don’t analyze and don’t expect more than she can give. Smile when she makes you happy, let her know when she makes you mad, and miss her when she’s not there.

Source: kushandwizdom

15th September 2014

Photo reblogged from to love, for love, from Love. with 8,653 notes

Source: spiritualinspiration

15th September 2014

Quote reblogged from Caelitus mihi vires. with 2,307 notes

You never go away from us, yet we have difficulty in returning to You. Come, Lord, stir us up and call us back. Kindle and seize us. Be our fire and our sweetness. Let us love. Let us run.
— Saint Augustine, Confessions (via closertothelost)

Source: closertothelost

15th September 2014

Quote reblogged from Sola Gratia with 1,198 notes

Grace isn’t leniency when we’ve sinned. Grace is the enabling gift of God not to sin. Grace is power, not just pardon.
— John Piper  (via littlethingsaboutgod)

Source: godmoves

15th September 2014

Quote reblogged from Inspiration for a Catholic Life with 1,680 notes

Start being brave about everything. Drive out darkness and spread light. Don’t look at your weaknesses. Realize instead that in Christ crucified you can do everything.
— St. Catherine of Siena (via imaginesisters)

Source: imaginesisters